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Sanctuary Worship


2022-08-28 10:30 2022-08-28 10:30 America/New_York Sanctuary Worship

Living the Spirit Life We are called; we are invited; we are equipped and empowered to live the Spirit life. It’s Pentecost again, time to celebrate and give thanks. We sometimes say that Pentecost is the birthday of the church. An argument can be made for that, certainly. But we could also say that the church was born in a manger in Bethlehem or dripping wet in the Jordan River when a voice declared, “You are my beloved Son, with you, I am well pleased.” Or perhaps it was born in gatherings of the crowds on the Galilean hillsides listening to teaching that seemed ancient and new at the same time. Or it was born when eyes were opened and legs were straightened and bleeding was stopped and even death gave way to a power and a presence. The church was born in a dark garden of betrayal and denial on a lonely cross on Golgotha. Or from an empty tomb early one morning when the sun rose. Is Pentecost the birthday of the church? Maybe, or maybe that’s when the church learned to walk on its own. Maybe that’s when, empowered by fire and wind, the church spoke on its own, but used words learned from the one who gave it life. On Pentecost, we celebrate the coming of the Spirit to raise the church out of hiding and out of despair and to give the church wind at the back and fire in the bones and to encourage the church to proclaim; no—to live the good news of Jesus Christ outwardly and invitationally. Pentecost is also the beginning of the long season we sometimes call Ordinary Time. The word ordinary comes from ordinal, meaning we count the Sundays—first Sunday after Pentecost, second Sunday after Pentecost, and so on. We don’t mean ordinary as in run of the mill and boring, same old, same old. No, in Ordinary Time, we are called; we are invited; we are equipped and empowered to live the Spirit life—a life first lived by the one we call Lord, Jesus of Nazareth. We take the reins, and we live for him, even as he lives in us. It’s Pentecost again, time to celebrate and give thanks. And to live the Spirit life. Rev. Dr. Derek Weber, Director of Preaching Ministries, General Board of Discipleship

Living the Spirit Life

We are called; we are invited; we are equipped and empowered to live the Spirit life.

It’s Pentecost again, time to celebrate and give thanks. We sometimes say that Pentecost is the birthday of the church. An argument can be made for that, certainly. But we could also say that the church was born in a manger in Bethlehem or dripping wet in the Jordan River when a voice declared, “You are my beloved Son, with you, I am well pleased.” Or perhaps it was born in gatherings of the crowds on the Galilean hillsides listening to teaching that seemed ancient and new at the same time. Or it was born when eyes were opened and legs were straightened and bleeding was stopped and even death gave way to a power and a presence. The church was born in a dark garden of betrayal and denial on a lonely cross on Golgotha. Or from an empty tomb early one morning when the sun rose.

Is Pentecost the birthday of the church? Maybe, or maybe that’s when the church learned to walk on its own. Maybe that’s when, empowered by fire and wind, the church spoke on its own, but used words learned from the one who gave it life. On Pentecost, we celebrate the coming of the Spirit to raise the church out of hiding and out of despair and to give the church wind at the back and fire in the bones and to encourage the church to proclaim; no—to live the good news of Jesus Christ outwardly and invitationally.

Pentecost is also the beginning of the long season we sometimes call Ordinary Time. The word ordinary comes from ordinal, meaning we count the Sundays—first Sunday after Pentecost, second Sunday after Pentecost, and so on. We don’t mean ordinary as in run of the mill and boring, same old, same old. No, in Ordinary Time, we are called; we are invited; we are equipped and empowered to live the Spirit life—a life first lived by the one we call Lord, Jesus of Nazareth. We take the reins, and we live for him, even as he lives in us. It’s Pentecost again, time to celebrate and give thanks. And to live the Spirit life.

Rev. Dr. Derek Weber, Director of Preaching Ministries, General Board of Discipleship